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Cooperative Gardens Commission

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Founded in March 2020, The Cooperative Gardens Commission (CGC), is a grassroots collective working toward food sovereignty in response to the COVID19 pandemic and persistent injustice. #coopgardens

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 day 11 hours ago

The Indigenous Seed Growers Network sprouted from the pandemic, and is quickly evolving to help communities secure their own food systems for generations to come.…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

Cooperative Gardens Commission

5 days 6 hours ago

"The incoming administration is being urged to halt the “categorical eligibility” SNAP rule proposed last year that would cut nutrition assistance for households with savings…

Join the Call! 8pm EST/5pm PST tonight! Register via the link in our bio, and go to Bi-Weekly Organizing Calls This year we have collectively…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

2 weeks 19 hours ago

For folks using fire heat to stay warm this winter, an adaptation of bio-char can serve as a great soil amendment. "Adding kitchen waste and…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

Cooperative Gardens Commission

2 weeks 6 days ago

We started growing 7 months ago, using the power of our interconnected social networks and gardens in an effort to stand up to the fear…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

Cooperative Gardens Commission

3 weeks 5 days ago

Epic garden!! #repost from @solara_goldwynn “Growing food in the city, in the country, on balconies, in jars on our kitchen counter, it’s all holy, it’s…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

3 weeks 6 days ago

This ugly chapter of history is an ominous reminder of the combustible nature of the forces roiling. Building understanding about the gravity of our current…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 month 3 days ago

Many Hands 257 seed hubs 41 states Based on a review of our initial survey responses we may have gotten seeds to a minimum of…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 month 4 days ago

"This piece was originally published by the Center for Public Integrity. Immigrants, especially Latinos, are risking their health in Hall County and across the country…

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 month 5 days ago

"WASHINGTON - A federal judge on Sunday formally struck down a Trump administration attempt to end food stamp benefits for nearly 700,000 unemployed people, blocking…

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Cooperative Gardens Commission

Community
400

Founded in March 2020, The Cooperative Gardens Commission (CGC), is a grassroots collective working toward food sovereignty in response to the COVID19 pandemic and persistent injustice. #coopgardens

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 day 11 hours ago

The Indigenous Seed Growers Network sprouted from the pandemic, and is quickly evolving to help communities secure their own food systems for generations to come.

...displacement wasn’t an accident, it was an intentional effort on the part of colonizers who wanted the land for themselves, says White. “The impacts of colonization, acculturation, and relocation have deeply impacted our ability to be on the land.” She hopes that the seed cooperative will help “revive ancestral knowledge” and begin to repair some of the trauma associated with that forced disconnect. There’s a coevolution of humans and seeds, White adds, and the two are “intimately intertwined and change one another. [There’s a] cultural memory that surrounds these seeds.”

Rowen White grew up with the Mohawk creation story, which tells of a woman falling from the sky world to the ocean and bringing seeds with her to start a new world. She says there was an agreement between her ancestors and plants to co-evolve. “We would give up a little of our wildness and the plants would give up a little of their wildness,” White says. “We’re direct lineal descendants from the food that we eat.”

For that reasons, White explains, “We actually have to care for them as though they’re our relatives.” In reviving that relationship, White finds herself reflecting on the fact that—despite colonization, industrial agriculture, and genocide—“the seeds never gave up on their side of the agreement.”

Cooperative Gardens Commission

Cooperative Gardens Commission

5 days 6 hours ago

"The incoming administration is being urged to halt the “categorical eligibility” SNAP rule proposed last year that would cut nutrition assistance for households with savings and other assets. Officials have said the rule would cut benefits to 3 million people and impede automatic access to free school meals for nearly 1 million children.

Anti-hunger groups are also calling on the president-elect to reverse the “public charge” rule, which would deny green cards to immigrants who use food stamps or other public benefits.
...
Nearly 11 percent of American adults, 24 million, reported that their household sometimes or often did not have enough to eat in the previous seven days, according to Household Pulse survey
data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau from Oct. 14 to 26. That was far above rates reported before the pandemic: 3.7 percent of adults reported that their household had “not enough to eat” at some point over the full 12 months of 2019, according to earlier survey data.

...

For Noreen Springstead, executive director at WhyHunger, a national nonprofit organization working to end hunger and poverty, the pandemic has laid bare the cracks in the American food system — record food insecurity, skyrocketing farm bankruptcies, unprecedented supply-chain disruptions — as well as the need for bold solutions. In addition to expanding SNAP and Pandemic EBT, the immediate next step should establishing a living minimal wage, she said."

Join the Call! 8pm EST/5pm PST tonight!
Register via the link in our bio, and go to Bi-Weekly Organizing Calls
This year we have collectively started 257 seed hubs in 41 states
Reaching an estimated 12,000 individual gardens and gardeners. What’s next?

Seed Distro Photos by Grace Winter
Boy with seeds photo by Jonathan McIntosh. He is from the 14 acre South Central Farm in Los Angeles. The documentary "The Garden" covers the story about one of the largest farm/community gardens in the US, which operated from 1994-2006. Heart-wrenching, good to watch, much to learn.

Cooperative Gardens Commission

2 weeks 19 hours ago

For folks using fire heat to stay warm this winter, an adaptation of bio-char can serve as a great soil amendment.

"Adding kitchen waste and charcoal to tropical soil can turn it into fertile, black soil which traps carbon and reduces emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere [...]
The soils produced by the 700-year-old practice, known as “African dark earths”, contain up to 300 percent more organic carbon than other soils, and are capable of supporting far more intensive farming..." Reuters

The article featured here is very inspiring and initiated a dual share!

www.reuters.com/article/us-africa-climatechange-farming/centuries-old-african-soil-technique-could-combat-climate-change-scientists-idUSKCN0Z72AK

Cooperative Gardens Commission

Cooperative Gardens Commission

2 weeks 6 days ago

We started growing 7 months ago, using the power of our interconnected social networks and gardens in an effort to stand up to the fear of mass food insecurity. We have learned the key is to stick together.

In a time when seeds were hard to come by the Cooperative Gardens Commission was formed and seed hubs were established. Thanks to the hard work of volunteers many people were able to grow food in the spring. Now we are in fall, the time of the final harvest before winter in much of the United States of America. Our growing cycle will soon begin again. As gardeners save seed for the next year to continue to grow we also save the inspiration that we have harvested by coming together to demand justice and grow food. Like Nature we will take this energy, replant it and multiply.

No matter what the outcome of the election, we are still going to be here working, growing and helping, doing what CGC does. We are one organization in the middle of many, a paradigm shift. We are part of the food movement. Food is something we all need--it connects us all.

In a monoculture the goal is to eliminate weeds and grow as much of one crop as possible. The USA is not a monoculture, rather a diverse field of plants with origins from all over. We recognize that, and embrace the fact that diversity makes us stronger.

Cooperative Gardens Commission

Cooperative Gardens Commission

3 weeks 5 days ago

Epic garden!! #repost from @solara_goldwynn “Growing food in the city, in the country, on balconies, in jars on our kitchen counter, it’s all holy, it’s all important. Planting seed and nurturing their growth, feeling connected to something bigger than a small human life. That big connection between fingers and potential, between tangible and intangible, between earth and mouth, linking us to all humanity from time immemorial.
(Our garden as seen from above-for another view and description of the elements see @hatchetnseed’s recent post).”

Cooperative Gardens Commission

3 weeks 6 days ago

This ugly chapter of history is an ominous reminder of the combustible nature of the forces roiling. Building understanding about the gravity of our current situation is critical to helping us move together towards a just and sustainable future. We're about food sovereignty and food security.

"Donald Trump’s presidency: public fear, ethnic scapegoating, political expedience, and disdain for civil liberties. But what’s frequently overlooked in the popular narrative of Japanese internment is the role of racialized economic anxiety in drumming up support for the mass incarceration..."

Consider what Latino, Latinx, Hispanic peoples are facing, who make up about 40% of the total food-related labor force.

"...as of 1940 some 45% of employed Japanese Americans in West Coast states were farmers, according to a 1982 report by the US government’s Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. The report concluded that resentment from white West Coast farmers provided part of the impetus for mass incarceration of Japanese descent. As AV Krebs, director of the Corporate Agribusiness Project, wrote in the Washington Post in 1992, “Based on an accumulation of evidence, we now know that the government’s action was partially initiated by California corporate agribusiness interests hoping to satisfy their own lust for land while ridding themselves of competition from the state’s most productive family farms.”

This is one of many reasons Cooperative Gardens Commission works across traditional divides. There is no true sustainability without acknowledging this history and working to address the patterns at play today.
#FoodSovereignty #FoodJustice #FoodSecurity #BIPOCLivesMatter

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 month 3 days ago

Many Hands
257 seed hubs
41 states
Based on a review of our initial survey responses we may have gotten seeds to a minimum of 12,000 individual gardens and gardeners. We’re hoping to get detailed numbers once we get the active seed hub survey results back.

If you’re a seed hub we’d love to hear from you! Please email coopgardens@gmail.com
We’re curious to know how last year went, some successes, any struggles, and what are you planning for next year? 

Any photos and/or video you’d like to share with us would be wonderful ways to share your story as well! Links to these (or files) can be sent via email, or tag us with #CoopGardens or #SeedCoopGardens

If you’re just about through this harvest season and curious about us just visit the link in our profile, CoopGardens.org
We welcome you!

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 month 4 days ago

"This piece was originally published by the Center for Public Integrity.

Immigrants, especially Latinos, are risking their health in Hall County and across the country as essential workers who grow, harvest and process food for Americans—while many of their families are blocked from the most basic COVID-19 financial support, including federal stimulus checks, other taxpayers were eligible to receive. Nationwide, research shows Latinos are among the hardest hit by COVID-19.

A Center for Public Integrity county-by-county analysis drives home how crucial Latino immigrants are to US farm and food-processing industries nationwide. The analysis was drawn from Census Bureau survey data collected by IPUMS USA at the University of Minnesota.

Focusing on 10 industries, Public Integrity found 1.87 million workers in front-line farm and food processing jobs, 790,000 of whom are immigrants. That’s about 43 percent, a share that’s two-and-a-half times the percent of immigrants in the total US workforce. Nearly nine in 10 of the immigrant farm and food-processing workers are Latino."

#FoodJustice #FoodSovereignty #JustTransitions #BIPOCLivesMatter #FoodFreedom

Cooperative Gardens Commission

1 month 5 days ago

"WASHINGTON - A federal judge on Sunday formally struck down a Trump administration attempt to end food stamp benefits for nearly 700,000 unemployed people, blocking as “arbitrary and capricious” the first of three such planned measures to restrict the federal food safety net."

Gardens can help develop food security in 2020! Join our bimonthly call tonight at 8pm Eastern/5pm Pacific. You can resister via CoopGardens.org today🌞

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