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Press

 

We held our first organizing conference call on March 20th, 2020.

Here’s some of the media coverage we’ve received since then…

How to grow your own food in a modern-day victory garden

By Adrian Higgins April 6, 2020

One silver lining of the coronavirus lockdown is that it comes at the start of the growing season. Between now and the fall, folks have the chance to coax food from the soil while also feeding the soul.

This year, a vegetable garden may also provide one thing we seem to be lacking at the moment: control over our lives. It includes the satisfaction of raising nutritious and delicious food, exercising outdoors while socially distancing, relieving pressure on the nation’s food supply system, passing essential knowledge on to your children and growing extra to share with others. At the very least, it’s a constructive distraction in a confined environment.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/how-to-grow-your-own-food-in-a-modern-day-victory-garden/2020/04/05/6a0fa7f0-737f-11ea-a9bd-9f8b593300d0_story.html

Grid Philly: Grow Hope, Not Fear

Grid Philly: Grow Hope, Not Fear

April 9th 2020: By Meenal Raval

What can you and I do about this? While our other activities have slowed down, a re-awakening of the importance of health and food could lead us into a space still accessible under a stay-at-home order: the garden. 

A garden offers us fresh air, fresher now due to fewer cars on the road. A garden offers us a reconnection with the Earth, which could reduce COVID-19 ignited stress. A garden offers us time away from our screens, also a way to step away from the constant discussions about this virus. A garden offers for a teaching and learning experience with our neighbors, allowing for the mandated six-foot distance, of course, plus produce to share. 

Read Full Article: https://www.gridphilly.com/blog-home/grow-hope-not-fear

New York Times: ‘If All the Stores Close, We Need Food’: Community Gardens Adapt to the Pandemic

New York Times: ‘If All the Stores Close, We Need Food’: Community Gardens Adapt to the Pandemic

By: Rachel Wharton April 10 2020

Around the United States, local growing operations are offering fresh produce and socially distanced outdoor time.

“Yes, there’s a pandemic, but we’re still here, we’re still working,” said Mr. Basora, 22, the acting manager of the garden, planted on an empty corner lot in the historic African-American neighborhood community

Read full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/10/dining/community-garden-coronavirus.html

Garden State of mind: N.J. gardeners defy pandemic to plant seeds, gather hope (and food)

Garden State of mind: N.J. gardeners defy pandemic to plant seeds, gather hope (and food)

By Amy Kuperinsky April 22, 2020

“I just want people to embrace the food and understand how important it is to grow your own food, especially now,” she says.

During the coronavirus pandemic, a time when death, illness and uncertainty dominate headlines, gardeners nurture life. Hope may spring eternal, but so will certain plants. For New Jersey gardeners, the hobby can provide both.

Abdullah and others with green thumbs prove the state lives up to its nickname. They aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty, planting produce, greenery and flowers (and thoroughly washing those hands when they’re done). When most people are expected to stay at home and many remain glued to screens, gardeners get outside, connecting with nature on their patches of earth. The fruits of this discipline are nourishment, a change of scenery and much-needed stress relief.

Read the full article: https://www.nj.com/coronavirus/2020/04/garden-state-of-mind-nj-gardeners-defy-pandemic-to-plant-seeds-gather-hope-and-food.html

The Philadelphia Inquirer: Philly garden activists are shipping millions of seeds to a nation fretting over food access during coronavirus pandemic

The Philadelphia Inquirer: Philly garden activists are shipping millions of seeds to a nation fretting over food access during coronavirus pandemic

by Samantha Melamed, April 27, 2020

One afternoon last week, at a table in the back of West Philadelphia’s Making Worlds bookstore, Kate Illes shook aji pepper seeds into hand-labeled envelopes. In a comfortable chair near a section on prisons and oppression, Nathan Kleinman bundled Brussels sprout seeds. And, over by the front desk, Trika Parasimo meted out melon seeds.

This makeshift assembly line is the nationwide hub of the Cooperative Gardens Commission. Inconspicuous though it may be, it’s the epicenter of a new food gardening movement born from this moment of scarcity — as Americans have seen grocery store shelves stripped bare by panic buying and viral photos of zucchini rotting in the field for want of distribution channels — and as millions of unemployed are suddenly staring down abundant free time, looming food insecurity, and a deep craving to be outdoors.

Read the full article: https://www.inquirer.com/real-estate/gardening/coronavirus-victory-gardens-cooperative-garden-commission-philadelphia-20200427.html

Foodtank: Nate Kleinman and Albie Miles on Community Food Sovereignty During COVID-19

Foodtank: Nate Kleinman and Albie Miles on Community Food Sovereignty During COVID-19

What do community food systems look like during COVID-19?

On “Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg,” Dani talks with Nate Kleinman, an activist and farmer who co-founded the Experimental Farming Network (EFN). EFN allows seed breeders and growers around the world to share techniques and calls-to-action, which Kleinman believes can help address climate change social injustices. He describes to Dani how community gardens can help restore local food sovereignty during COVID-19.

Original Story here: https://foodtank.com/news/2020/04/nate-kleinman-and-albie-miles-on-community-food-sovereignty-during-covid-19/

Slate.com, How to Grow Your Own Food Even if you’ve never gardened

Slate.com, How to Grow Your Own Food Even if you’ve never gardened

By NITISH PAHWA APRIL 28, 2020

To hear tell of the gardening craze that has spread across the U.S. in recent weeks, it would seem we’re in the middle of a victory garden resurgence. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disrupted supply chains and ground everyday life to a halt, terrified and ingenious Americans are turning to their backyards to revitalize their green thumbs or take on new planting passions.

The original victory gardens, dating from World War I, were top-down national initiatives begun in response to international crop failures and food shortages, not to mention the conscription of farmers to the battlefields. The most iconic of these gardens, from the Second World War, were also a government-led effort, spurred by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help lower the cost of food provided to the troops. Today’s pandemic-spurred gardening initiatives are more of a personal endeavor than an effort to mass produce food for a nation in international battle. But some of the original movement’s spirit remains: Gardening is a way for people to turn their feelings of helplessness into something nourishing. It’s also proved to be a way to form new relationships—community gardening projects, such as Nate Kleinman’s Cooperative Gardens Commission, have sprouted up around the country, with the goal of teaching Americans to garden and providing the food grown to those suffering the most during this pandemic.

Read The Full Article: https://slate.com/human-interest/2020/04/how-to-start-a-vegetable-garden.html

April 2020

March 2020